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Old 03-04-2024, 08:39 PM   #29
N Camarolina

 
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I'm not a fan of the bleeders simply because there is a simpler and faster alternative by using a (dry) pressure tank bleeder.

Fill fluid resevoir, attach pump tank to fluid resovoir tank, pump up the pressure, and open the caliper nipples one by one while you watch what's flowing out the nipple into your tube/collection bottle; close nipple when you've bled enough fluid. Rinse repeat at all 4 corners of the car.
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Old 03-05-2024, 08:33 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N Camarolina View Post
I'm not a fan of the bleeders simply because there is a simpler and faster alternative by using a (dry) pressure tank bleeder.

Fill fluid resevoir, attach pump tank to fluid resovoir tank, pump up the pressure, and open the caliper nipples one by one while you watch what's flowing out the nipple into your tube/collection bottle; close nipple when you've bled enough fluid. Rinse repeat at all 4 corners of the car.
That is definitely an option, but when you're out at the track, that's one less thing (the pump tank) to have to take with you. This SB makes it super easy to do. And I am all about easy. Lol
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Old 03-05-2024, 08:41 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Texan4iu View Post
That is definitely an option, but when you're out at the track, that's one less thing (the pump tank) to have to take with you. This SB makes it super easy to do. And I am all about easy. Lol
Good point. I don't take my pump tank due to space and "too much stuff" constraints. But having said that, I haven't had to bleed the breaks at the track yet, and I've done 23 track days so far. Other than boiling the fluid (doesn't seem to happen with SRF), I'm not sure what event would prompt the need to.
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Old 03-13-2024, 12:39 AM   #32
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I've tried different tools over the years.


First I've tried a pressure tank bleeder, and it didn't work well at all. At best it leaves the brake fluid tank filled to the brim and a little more in the feeder tube, and then it spills over when you disconnect the bleeder, in the middle you don't have the right cap for your car, and at worst the cap doesn't hold the pressure and you get the brake fluid sprayed all over the place.


I've had the speed bleeders on Gen-4 Camaro but didn't bother with them on the other cars, as a manual vacuum pump turned out to be not much worse. The only tricks to make the work easier with the manual pump is to suck out the old fluid form the reservoir and replace with the fresh one first, then it's about the order: usually people say to start with the farthest wheel, but in this case you end up pumping all the old fluid from the bottom of the tank through the longest narrowest line. Start from the left-front instead, it's the shortest widest line, and after you do that, go in whatever order.


But the best solution by far is an electric vacuum pump. You can borrow one from Autozone for free, or buy one there (online only) for about $100. Much faster and easier than all the other options.
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Old 03-13-2024, 10:56 PM   #33
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I've tried different tools over the years.


First I've tried a pressure tank bleeder, and it didn't work well at all. At best it leaves the brake fluid tank filled to the brim and a little more in the feeder tube, and then it spills over when you disconnect the bleeder, in the middle you don't have the right cap for your car, and at worst the cap doesn't hold the pressure and you get the brake fluid sprayed all over the place.
Totally different experience (to the positive) if you use the pressure tank "dry" (pressure bleeder used to supply air pressure only, while brake fluid is kept only in the brake fluid reservoir). This approach creates no mess and leaves the brake fluid reservoir as low or high as you want it when you're done. The only downside is that for a full flush, you'll need to refill the brake fluid reservoir once or twice, which will require removing and reattaching the pressure bleeder.
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Old 03-14-2024, 03:37 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N Camarolina View Post
Totally different experience (to the positive) if you use the pressure tank "dry" (pressure bleeder used to supply air pressure only, while brake fluid is kept only in the brake fluid reservoir). This approach creates no mess and leaves the brake fluid reservoir as low or high as you want it when you're done. The only downside is that for a full flush, you'll need to refill the brake fluid reservoir once or twice, which will require removing and reattaching the pressure bleeder.
+1 for this method. Been doing it for several years. Works GREAT!
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Old 03-14-2024, 08:00 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N Camarolina View Post
Totally different experience (to the positive) if you use the pressure tank "dry" (pressure bleeder used to supply air pressure only, while brake fluid is kept only in the brake fluid reservoir). This approach creates no mess and leaves the brake fluid reservoir as low or high as you want it when you're done. The only downside is that for a full flush, you'll need to refill the brake fluid reservoir once or twice, which will require removing and reattaching the pressure bleeder.
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+1 for this method. Been doing it for several years. Works GREAT!
+2, this is also what we did last time with Jim (L78toLT1) when changing the brake fluid on my car. Works very well---disconnecting/reconnecting the bleeder a few times isn't a big hassle IMO considering how little a mess one can get away with when using this method.
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Old 03-14-2024, 10:17 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N Camarolina View Post
I'm not a fan of the bleeders simply because there is a simpler and faster alternative by using a (dry) pressure tank bleeder.

Fill fluid resevoir, attach pump tank to fluid resovoir tank, pump up the pressure, and open the caliper nipples one by one while you watch what's flowing out the nipple into your tube/collection bottle; close nipple when you've bled enough fluid. Rinse repeat at all 4 corners of the car.
First time I will be trying this approach (having only used the "two person" method on my previous vehicles). When you say to watch for "when you've bled enough fluid," does that just equate to seeing clean brake fluid and no air bubbles?
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Old 03-14-2024, 09:29 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by The Maverick View Post
First time I will be trying this approach (having only used the "two person" method on my previous vehicles). When you say to watch for "when you've bled enough fluid," does that just equate to seeing clean brake fluid and no air bubbles?
Good question.
If you are aiming to merely bleed the brakes to remove possible air bubbles, then you are watching the exiting fluid for bubbles moving through the tubing to your waste collection bottle/vessel. Or if bleeding the brakes to move fresh fluid through the calipers, then you'll be looking for the color to change to the "fresh fluid color" which is usually lighter than fluid that's seen a lot of heat (though will depend on which brand of brake fluid you use).

If on the other hand you are wanting to flush the entire system with new fluid, then you'll either be looking for a color change in the exiting fluid at the caliper nipple (assuming there actually is a difference in color between the old and the new fluid), or if there is no color difference you'll have to measure the quantity of fluid you are collecting at each caliper. A rough target I got from an older post on this forum was to flush through the following amounts at each corner in the following order (RR 250ml; LF 250ml; LR 200ml; RF 200ml). You'll need to divide the amount for each corner between the inside and outside caliper nipple. And for some reason, bleed the inside nipple before the outside nipple.

Most of us who track the Camaro use Castrol SRF brake fluid. While I love it compared to Motul, it doesn't change color even after a season of track use. So when it comes time to flush it, you can't use color as an indicator of when to stop (thus the need to measure volume coming out).
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Old 03-15-2024, 12:01 AM   #38
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Great answer that covered the bases, thanks!
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Old 03-31-2024, 01:33 AM   #39
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Something to consider. The tanks like the Motiv set up are actually introducing air into your precious fluid. This is especially a problem in high humidity areas. Remember brake fluid absorbs moisture. The old pressure bleeders you no longer see were the best method. The fluid was isolated by a bladder. The opposite side of the bladder was then exposed to pressurized air. Thus isolating the fluid from air and any moisture. I’ve been looking for a unit for years but to no avail. There is one available however it requires gallons of fluid as the vessel is designed for a high volume brake shop. Just something to think about next time you use a Motiv style bleeder.
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Old 03-31-2024, 01:40 AM   #40
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https://jmcautomotiveequipment.com/s...r-no-adaptors/

The comment regarding the potential for a mess is a valid point. On my old car (ACR) Miller made a specific adapter for the master, it was noted in the factory service manual. I used a series of ball valves to minimize fluid loss and movement.

Last edited by Camfab; 03-31-2024 at 01:56 AM.
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Old 03-31-2024, 02:06 AM   #41
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Old 03-31-2024, 07:04 AM   #42
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Something to consider. The tanks like the Motiv set up are actually introducing air into your precious fluid. This is especially a problem in high humidity areas. Remember brake fluid absorbs moisture.
Unless you overfill the reservoir, your brake fluid is always exposed to air in the same location as when you use a Motive pressure bleeder. The only concern about air in a brake system is if it gets into the lines, but that's not an issue with a pressure bleeder (unless you let the fluid level get too low in the reservoir).
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