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-   -   Oil Catch Can Crankcase Pressure? (https://www.camaro6.com/forums/showthread.php?t=601659)

1LE4free 01-22-2022 08:13 AM

Oil Catch Can Crankcase Pressure?
 
Im in the market to add a catch can to my 22 1LE and very new to the GM space (Mazdaspeed prior). I have been doing research to smooth out some of my concerns. There are a million studies on how much oil the cans catch BUT I feel as if there may be lack of research on how these affect the baseline crankcase pressure (i.e. with stock setup) and the potential deterioration of filter medias that the brands use. I have some questions I would love to find answers to, or at least discuss thoughts below:

1. Is there any R&D info from the common names (Mishimoto, Eliter Eng., Might Mouse) that addresses the concern of restriction that could increase baseline crankcase pressure and any stories of the negative effects from that?

2. How come people do not just run a single inlet (no exit hose) or a hose to ground with a filtered VTA to address restriction concerns and eliminate recirculation? Is it because the VTA in the engine bay causes a ton of soot build up?

3. Are there any modern concerns of the deterioration of filter medias that ultimately can make their way into the cylinder and cause harm?

For context, I wont be going power mod crazy during the warranty, but this car will be driven aggressively on mountain roads on the weekends and will likely see a few track laps here and there. I would be interested in going the sealed can route if I was able to convince myself that they do not increase the baseline crankcase pressure. Any info would be appreciated!

GTO_Gregory 01-22-2022 02:21 PM

I think the better catch cans use metal baffles, or a steel mesh for long life.
I doubt the catch cans reduce any crank case pressure as you are not creating additional vacuum.
I ran a GZMotorsports Sportsman Vacuum pump on my LS2-402 and there is a noticeable difference. With a vacuum in the crank case the engine revved must faster and easier. The system has its own vented catch can and twenty laps at Texas World Speedway with 0W-30 oil filled up the catch can.

1LE4free 01-22-2022 09:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GTO_Gregory (Post 11124060)
I think the better catch cans use metal baffles, or a steel mesh for long life.
I doubt the catch cans reduce any crank case pressure as you are not creating additional vacuum.
I ran a GZMotorsports Sportsman Vacuum pump on my LS2-402 and there is a noticeable difference. With a vacuum in the crank case the engine revved must faster and easier. The system has its own vented catch can and twenty laps at Texas World Speedway with 0W-30 oil filled up the catch can.

Would you typically only do this for bigger power/cam? I wonder if I’d be going overboard on preventive measures if I don’t plan to power add. I’ve heard horror stories about catch cans getting gunked up and blown seals

GTO_Gregory 01-23-2022 08:36 PM

I'm not exactly why I had to use a vacuum pump, but I'm glad I did.
My LS2-402 seemed to have ring blow-by that elevated crankcase pressure.
I believe the blow-by existed because the 402 used the 6.0-liter block with shorter cylinder sleeves due to the shorter 3.62 0" stroke. The 4.000" stroke crankshaft caused the pistons to rock a tiny bit at the bottom of the stroke. The tiny bit of rock allowed blowby. The higher 13.0:1 compression compounded things.

Typically, though it seems higher compression race motors use vacuum pumps.
My combination made 554HP at tire on 93-octane.


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